Traveling Song




Swamp-Singers-195

Traveling Song

Singing by local women’s hand drum group, Miskwaasining Nagamojig (Swamp Singers)

The Traveling song came to us from the Snowbirds, a mid-Michigan women’s hand-drum group. Kim Wensaut, Pottawatomie linguist and former Snowbird, told us recently that one of the women added the Ojibwe language verse. The song had traditionally just included vocables, and is sung as a parting song, to send people on their way – either on a journey, or when they walk on. When sung as a funeral song, it is sung slowly, in a more mournful manner. Women’s hand-drum groups had adopted use of the song, with Ojibwe lyrics. The Miskwaasining Nagamojig/Swamp Singers added three additional versions (to include singular and plural singers and recipients).

 
Lead: Way hey ya hey ya hey oh

Vocables: way hey ya hey ya hey oh
Way hey ya hey ya hey oh
Way hey ya hey ya hey oh

Us ->Yous

G’naadamoimin ina Gizhemanido? / Can you help us Great Spirit?
G’naadamoimin ina Gizhemanido? / Can you help us Great Spirit?
Gweyak ji bimoseyaang / To walk straight
Baa maampii g’ga waabamigom / So long and we will see yous

Us ->You

G’naadamoimin ina Gizhemanido? / Can you help us Great Spirit?
G’naadamoimin ina Gizhemanido? / Can you help us Great Spirit?
Gweyak ji bimoseyaang / To walk straight
Baa maampii g’ga waabamigo / So long and we will see you

Me ->Yous

G’naadamoimin ina Gizhemanido? / Can you help us Great Spirit?
G’naadamoimin ina Gizhemanido ?/ Can you help us Great Spirit?
Gweyak ji bimoseyaang / To walk straight
Baa maampii g’ga waabaminim / So long and I will see yous

Me ->You

G’naadamoimin ina Gizhemanido? / Can you help us Great Spirit?
G’naadamoimin ina Gizhemanido ?/ Can you help us Great Spirit?
Gweyak ji bimoseyaang / To walk straight
Baa maampii g’ga waabamin / So long and I will see you